Formula injection

About Formula Injection

Almost every website today provides social, financial or informative detail to the internet users. Websites that contain sensitive data about users, such as banks, social networks and online stores, restrict the access to private data by using access-control measures such as authentication, authorization encryption mechanisms and more.
However, hackers are still able to find their way to the “prize” with very clever attacking techniques, as their primary target is usually the sensitive data behind the application.

In the following post we will review an unusual injection type, with a great potential to cause some SERIOUS DAMAGE if initiated. Well… how can it be initiated? It depends, primarily on the web application programmers, BUT also on the user himself.

Let’s start by saying that every application uses untrusted data.

Since the application is intended to be used by the public – we don’t know whether the user is a legitimate one, or a hacker trying numerous types of attacks in order to hijack user sessions, credentials and/or sensitive data such as credit card numbers.
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SSL Vulnerabilities Analyzer 1.1 published

Hi people

After a few months of work and research we have updated the SSL Analyzer tool to version 1.1. So, here is a description about the SSL Analyzer and who should use it.

SSL Vulnerabilities Analyzer

What is it?

This tool was created for penetration testers and for site administrations who want to check if their server allows usage of insecure SSL algorithms.

SSL did not allow attackers to read/change the traffic between the client (computer/mobile browser) and the server, if the server allows insecure algorithms, the attacker can force the browser to use them and break the encryption (as they are named, they are insecure algorithms…).

Easy to use

SSL Vulnerabilities Analyzer has a nice interactive tool that makes it easy to run and check if the server contains insecure algorithms also for non-technical people.

Source code

SSL vulnerabilities analyzer shared with his source code under GPL v3 license, as a gift back to the open source community.


You can download the current version (1.1) from here: SSL Analyzer version 1.1 zip

For more details, source code and versions, please visit the dedicated area in our website:

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Domain hijacking & Range attack by cPanel

cPanel navigates the requests that are sent to the server to the correct account according to domain. Of course, the account owner must declare that the domain belongs to him. In order to ensure that the domain does, in fact, belong to him, cPanel offers two options (without EPP code):

1. To refer the domain DNS to the DNS storage server.

2. To create a randomly-named file on the domain, created by cPanel, which is unique per-user.

cPanel assign domain options

I will go into some detail regarding the first option.

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When Crypto Goes Wrong – Presentation


Slides from erez’s “When Crypto Goes Wrong” presentation at yesterday’s OWASP Israel 2011 conference.

When Crypto Goes Wrong – Presentation

EvilQR – When QRCode goes bad

Security assessment of mobile QR readers – Updated (30-Nov-2011)

Quick Response code, also known as QRCode has been around for several years, but in the last months there has been an incline in adoption of QRcodes as a marketing channel. A QRcode can encode a variety of information into a 2-dimentional barcode that is presented to the costumer. Customers are often referred by vendors into scanning QRCodes in order to receive coupons, discounts or other marketing media such as website, flash movie etc. The QRCode is parsed by QR-reader software on a mobile phone equipped with a camera. The true nature of QRcode content is an enigma until it is scanned; there is no possibility for the customer to authenticate the content of a QRcode without scanning it first. Because of the latter fact, an attacker with evil intent could craft a malicious QRCode (or evilQR) and lure an innocent customer to scan it. Once scanned the evilQR would be parsed by the customer mobile phone software and would initiate its’ attack. Attack vectors could vary from browser-based such as Cross-Site-Scripting (XSS) to specific buffer-overflow and command injection. The key for a successful attack lays in the default behavior of the mobile QRCode reader software. If as an example, a QRCode reader parses a link from a evilQR and preforms a URL redirection without proper confirmation of the customer – the attack would succeed. In this assessment we have compared the default behavior of several QR-readers for and noted their behavior upon the parsing of two evilQRs. Best practices for mobile users are also discussed.

The problem:

 An innocent customer can be easily tricked into scanning a malicious-crafted QRCode (evilQR) by an attacker, upon scanning the customer mobile would be attacked by the encoded payload.


The motive for executing such attack is very clear – the mobile phone is a gold mine for an attacker, because today’s phone contains very sensitive information such that can be abused by an attacker in several ways:

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